Sweet Potato Slips Experiment Update

Doesn’t it always seem like once you completely start losing hope on something, it finally happens, like magic…

I honestly started questioning my judgement in conducting my sweet potato experiment and thought that my sweet potato chunks were going to soon start stanking up my kitchen and cause me to have a fruit fly problem.  This may certainly still happen, hehe, but NOW it will be worth it because I have slips to plant!

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I know, they look pretty funky (some may say gross), but I am totally pumped that the slips FINALLY starting popping out of the tops of the potatoes.  The roots formed first, probably within a week, and then as I suspected the slips started slowly growing out of the bumps on top of the potatoes.  The Jewel sweet potato has slips growing on both halves, but one half is certainly growing more vigorously than the other.  It is interesting because one half of my Japanese sweet potato (the longer slender one) is not really growing any roots or slips.  I think I may have read that cutting it a certain way may produce better results.  I think more research needs to be done on my part.  Oh well, you live and you learn.

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Below I tried to take a close up picture of the roots because they definitely look like some sort of nasty centipede…

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I am going to continue filling their pool with an inch of water and let the slips grow a bit bigger (and let the weather get warmer outside) before I figure out how to transplant them.  I am hoping to plant them in whiskey barrel planters.

In honor of May the 4th tomorrow, I have a new model to posing with my sweet potatoes:

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What did the sweet potato say to Luke Skywalker?

“Luke, I yam your father.”

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3 thoughts on “Sweet Potato Slips Experiment Update

  1. Looking good! I am also giving this a try and have no idea how the slips go from being a part on the sweet potato to going in the ground. Certainly a learning experience. I think a potato barrel will work well, especially with the attractive foliage flowing over the edges. I am going to try trellising mine. Here’s hoping we both have luck!!

    Liked by 1 person

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